Recent blog entries

25 Jun 2016 Gilbou   » (Journeyer)

did not post anything for years. finished learning c# and used it for several projects. now learning java. upgraded my main box to the latest fedora and playing with netbeans. i kinda like the gnome 3 desktop, once you learn the keyboard shortcuts it's quite fast and sweet. no idea what all the fuss about gnome changes is about.

25 Jun 2016 pabs3   » (Master)

DebCamp16 day 2

Review wiki RecentChanges since my bookmark. Usual spam reporting. Mention microG on #debian-mobile. Answer pkg-config question on #debian-mentors. Suggest using UUIDs in response to a debian-arm query. Reported Debian bug #828103 against needrestart. A giant yellow SOS crane between the balcony hacklab and a truly misty city. Locate the 2014 Debian & stuff podcast on archive.org. Poke the SPARC porters in response to a suggestion on debian-www. Mention systemctl daemon-reload wrt buildd service changes. Automate updating some extension lists from check-all-the-things. Reported wishlist Debian bug #828128 against debsources. Engage lizard mode! Wish for better display technology. Nice vegetarian food with nice folks and interesting discussions with interesting locals. Polish and release check-all-the-things. Close bugs I forgot to close in the changelog. Add link to debian-boot on Debootstrap wiki page. Notice first mockup of a theme for Debian stretch. Answer a question about package naming on #debian-mentors. Discuss the future of cross compilation on Debian. Notice a talk about FOSSology & update a wiki page. Mention AsteroidOS and MaruOS on the mobile wiki page. Contemplate how close to the FSDG Debian might be and approaches to improving that.

Syndicated 2016-06-25 19:49:32 from Advogato

25 Jun 2016 LaForge   » (Master)

Recent public allegations against Jacob Appelbaum

In recent days, various public allegations have been brought forward against Jacob Appelbaum. The allegations rank from plagiarism to sexual assault and rape.

I find it deeply disturbing that the alleged victims are putting up the effort of a quite slick online campaign to defame Jakes's name, using a domain name consisting of only his name and virtually any picture you can find online of him from the last decade, and - to a large extent - hide in anonymity.

I'm upset about this not because I happen to know Jake personally for many years, but because I think it is fundamentally wrong to bring up those accusations in such a form.

I have no clue what is the truth or what is not the truth. Nor does anyone else who has not experienced or witnessed the alleged events first hand. I'd hope more people would think about that before commenting on this topic one way or another on Twitter, in their blogs, on mailing lists, etc. It doesn't matter what we believe, hypothesize or project based on a personal like or dislike of either the person accused or of the accusers.

We don't live in the middle ages, and we have given up on the pillory for a long time (and the pillory was used after a judgement, not before). If there was illegal/criminal behavior, then our societies have a well-established and respected procedure to deal with such: It is based on laws, legal procedure and courts.

So if somebody has a claim, they can and should seek legal support and bring those claims forward to the competent authorities, rather than starting what very easily looks like a smear campaign (whether it is one or not).

Please don't get me wrong: I have the deepest respect and sympathies for victims of sexual assault or abuse - but I also have a deep respect for the legal foundation our societies have built over hundreds of years, and it's principles including the human right "presumption of innocence".

No matter who has committed which type of crime, everyone deserve to receive a fair trial, and they are innocent until proven guilty.

I believe nobody deserves such a public defamation campaign, nor does anyone have the authority to sentence such a verdict, not even a court of law. The Pillory was abandoned for good reasons.

Syndicated 2016-06-06 10:00:00 from LaForge's home page

24 Jun 2016 pabs3   » (Master)

DebCamp16 day 1

Hating jetlag based headache. Disturbed to see the Brexit result. Review wiki RecentChanges. Answer some questions about Launchpad on #debian-mentors. Whitelisted one user in the wiki anti-spam system. Reviewed and sponsored yamllint 1.2.2-1 upload. Noted OFSET repo is broken and updated Freeduc info. Noted the Epidemic-Linux website is having database issues. Noted that Facebook finally completely dropped their RSS feeds, dropped Facebook RSS feed URL generation from the Debian derivatives census scripts and notified the affected derivatives. Cleared up Tanglu hash sum mismatches again. Minor changes to Planet Debian derivatives. Enjoyed the photos from Valessio. Hazy city away from the mountain and tablecloth clouds flowing over the mountain on the way to a pub lunch. Jet lag headaches seem to be subsiding thankfully. Ping someone generating a bounce when changing their SSH key. Mention autorevision and other suggestions in an IRC discussion about mesa & reproducible builds. Review some DebConf16 announcements and add minor fix. Push out some TODO items to check-all-the-things. Ask for a dd-list for the GCC 6 transition. Usual spam reporting throughout the day via manual List-Archive copy-paste, feeding mboxen to my report-spam-debian-lists and report-spam-debian-bugs scripts and manual BTS clicks. Usual wondering why there isn't an RFC for MUA spam reporting. Disturbed by the sudden appearance of an astronautess in the orga room but placated by a plentiful supply of crisps. Ask x32 folks about debian-x32.org vs x32 on ports.d.o. Glad to just avoid the room shuffle dance. Finish mime support for check-all-the-things. Disappointed that piz.za does not actually resolve. Amused by pollito's virtual tour of UTC. Completely stuffed full of Butleritos.

Syndicated 2016-06-24 17:46:11 from Advogato

24 Jun 2016 marnanel   » (Journeyer)

strip-lighted paradise

I was reading this two days ago. It needs saying today.

“Men use up their lives in heart-breaking political struggles… not in order to establish some central-heated, air-conditioned, strip-lighted Paradise, but because they want a world in which human beings love one another instead of swindling and murdering one another.” - George Orwell, 1943.
This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/371703.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Syndicated 2016-06-24 13:04:01 from Monument

23 Jun 2016 pabs3   » (Master)

DebCamp16 day 0

Today is officially the first day of DebCamp 2016. The night wasn't as cold as I had feared. Woke at 5am for some reason. Noted the network still blocks port 6697 and 7000, worked around in IRC client configuration using 9999. Reply to network discussion to point that out. Minor changes to the empathy Debian RTC wiki page. Answer support@mentors.d.n bug email about shared company OpenPGP keys and suggest moving to individual keys. Review wiki RecentChanges. Comment on NetworkManager upstream bug #705545 that MAC address privacy is a complicated feature with many use cases. Warn another person that reporting Alioth to SpamCop does nothing and link to the unsubscription URL. Talk to Brown about IP address conflict sparc64 porters found with the setup of notker (sparc64 build machine). Filed Debian wishlist bug #827944 against at asking for support for using an editor to write at jobs. Woke up properly, discussed spam over breakfast. Notice Point Linux in the Distrowatch feed and invite them to the derivatives census. Point out reproducible builds in a discussion about source-only uploads. Commented that I encountered evolution upstream crash bug #680471 again. Reported gnome-shell upstream crash bug #767969. Joined the tour around the campus, enjoyed the view from the outdoor hacklab at the top of the hill. Confirmed that "Monkey Gland" from the pub menu is not in fact derived from monkeys in any way. Noted that Pollito did not eat chicken from the buffet. Beat head against VPN/SIP/WebRTC for a while but oncoming jetlag put me out of business for some hours. Pointed out the future Packages.gz removal in favour of Packages.xz to the popcon developers.

Syndicated 2016-06-23 21:16:41 from Advogato

23 Jun 2016 marnanel   » (Journeyer)

the Holy Spirit versus cardboard

A story I was told at St Mark’s, a “high” Anglican church:

St Mark’s has a rather large contingent of de jure Roman Catholics in its congregation, who argued with the local parish priest or the Vatican and just decamped down the road. Many times this only gets discovered when they die and ask for their ashes to be interred in St Mark’s columbarium, whereupon the local RC priest turns up and objects.

So after this had happened a few times, they agreed that a small part of the columbarium would be dedicated as a RC burial place. And so that God wouldn’t get confused, they put a cardboard divider between them.

The person telling me this story concluded, “So apparently cardboard can block the Holy Spirit, just like alpha particles… wait. Don’t mitres have cardboard inside to keep the shape? I think we’ve discovered something here…”

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/371398.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Syndicated 2016-06-23 18:11:42 from Monument

22 Jun 2016 pabs3   » (Master)

DebCamp16 day -1

Landed late due to technical delays. Mountains! Mountains are everywhere! Beautiful sunny day with clear blue skies. Ran into Valessio as I was shown to my room. Wandered around the campus for a bunch of hours. Ate an all you can eat yum buffet lunch at the pub. Wandered down the hill and ended up on the train and wandering around a lake with lilies in a park. Arriving back at UCT we ran into a beer mission along with some wonderful arriving folks. The warm DebConf nervous centre was quite inviting and soon had plentiful beer, pizza and discussion.

Syndicated 2016-06-22 16:34:18 from Advogato

22 Jun 2016 mjg59   » (Master)

I've bought some more awful IoT stuff

I bought some awful WiFi lightbulbs a few months ago. The short version: they introduced terrible vulnerabilities on your network, they violated the GPL and they were also just bad at being lightbulbs. Since then I've bought some other Internet of Things devices, and since people seem to have a bizarre level of fascination with figuring out just what kind of fractal of poor design choices these things frequently embody, I thought I'd oblige.

Today we're going to be talking about the KanKun SP3, a plug that's been around for a while. The idea here is pretty simple - there's lots of devices that you'd like to be able to turn on and off in a programmatic way, and rather than rewiring them the simplest thing to do is just to insert a control device in between the wall and the device andn ow you can turn your foot bath on and off from your phone. Most vendors go further and also allow you to program timers and even provide some sort of remote tunneling protocol so you can turn off your lights from the comfort of somebody else's home.

The KanKun has all of these features and a bunch more, although when I say "features" I kind of mean the opposite. I plugged mine in and followed the install instructions. As is pretty typical, this took the form of the plug bringing up its own Wifi access point, the app on the phone connecting to it and sending configuration data, and the plug then using that data to join your network. Except it didn't work. I connected to the plug's network, gave it my SSID and password and waited. Nothing happened. No useful diagnostic data. Eventually I plugged my phone into my laptop and ran adb logcat, and the Android debug logs told me that the app was trying to modify a network that it hadn't created. Apparently this isn't permitted as of Android 6, but the app was handling this denial by just trying again. I deleted the network from the system settings, restarted the app, and this time the app created the network record and could modify it. It still didn't work, but that's because it let me give it a 5GHz network and it only has a 2.4GHz radio, so one reset later and I finally had it online.

The first thing I normally do to one of these things is run nmap with the -O argument, which gives you an indication of what OS it's running. I didn't really need to in this case, because if I just telnetted to port 22 I got a dropbear ssh banner. Googling turned up the root password ("p9z34c") and I was logged into a lightly hacked (and fairly obsolete) OpenWRT environment.

It turns out that here's a whole community of people playing with these plugs, and it's common for people to install CGI scripts on them so they can turn them on and off via an API. At first this sounds somewhat confusing, because if the phone app can control the plug then there clearly is some kind of API, right? Well ha yeah ok that's a great question and oh good lord do things start getting bad quickly at this point.

I'd grabbed the apk for the app and a copy of jadx, an incredibly useful piece of code that's surprisingly good at turning compiled Android apps into something resembling Java source. I dug through that for a while before figuring out that before packets were being sent, they were being handed off to some sort of encryption code. I couldn't find that in the app, but there was a native ARM library shipped with it. Running strings on that showed functions with names matching the calls in the Java code, so that made sense. There were also references to AES, which explained why when I ran tcpdump I only saw bizarre garbage packets.

But what was surprising was that most of these packets were substantially similar. There were a load that were identical other than a 16-byte chunk in the middle. That plus the fact that every payload length was a multiple of 16 bytes strongly indicated that AES was being used in ECB mode. In ECB mode each plaintext is split up into 16-byte chunks and encrypted with the same key. The same plaintext will always result in the same encrypted output. This implied that the packets were substantially similar and that the encryption key was static.

Some more digging showed that someone had figured out the encryption key last year, and that someone else had written some tools to control the plug without needing to modify it. The protocol is basically ascii and consists mostly of the MAC address of the target device, a password and a command. This is then encrypted and sent to the device's IP address. The device then sends a challenge packet containing a random number. The app has to decrypt this, obtain the random number, create a response, encrypt that and send it before the command takes effect. This avoids the most obvious weakness around using ECB - since the same plaintext always encrypts to the same ciphertext, you could just watch encrypted packets go past and replay them to get the same effect, even if you didn't have the encryption key. Using a random number in a challenge forces you to prove that you actually have the key.

At least, it would do if the numbers were actually random. It turns out that the plug is just calling rand(). Further, it turns out that it never calls srand(). This means that the plug will always generate the same sequence of challenges after a reboot, which means you can still carry out replay attacks if you can reboot the plug. Strong work.

But there was still the question of how the remote control works, since the code on github only worked locally. tcpdumping the traffic from the server and trying to decrypt it in the same way as local packets worked fine, and showed that the only difference was that the packet started "wan" rather than "lan". The server decrypts the packet, looks at the MAC address, re-encrypts it and sends it over the tunnel to the plug that registered with that address.

That's not really a great deal of authentication. The protocol permits a password, but the app doesn't insist on it - some quick playing suggests that about 90% of these devices still use the default password. And the devices are all based on the same wifi module, so the MAC addresses are all in the same range. The process of sending status check packets to the server with every MAC address wouldn't take that long and would tell you how many of these devices are out there. If they're using the default password, that's enough to have full control over them.

There's some other failings. The github repo mentioned earlier includes a script that allows arbitrary command execution - the wifi configuration information is passed to the system() command, so leaving a semicolon in the middle of it will result in your own commands being executed. Thankfully this doesn't seem to be true of the daemon that's listening for the remote control packets, which seems to restrict its use of system() to data entirely under its control. But even if you change the default root password, anyone on your local network can get root on the plug. So that's a thing. It also downloads firmware updates over http and doesn't appear to check signatures on them, so there's the potential for MITM attacks on the plug itself. The remote control server is on AWS unless your timezone is GMT+8, in which case it's in China. Sorry, Western Australia.

It's running Linux and includes Busybox and dnsmasq, so plenty of GPLed code. I emailed the manufacturer asking for a copy and got told that they wouldn't give it to me, which is unsurprising but still disappointing.

The use of AES is still somewhat confusing, given the relatively small amount of security it provides. One thing I've wondered is whether it's not actually intended to provide security at all. The remote servers need to accept connections from anywhere and funnel decent amounts of traffic around from phones to switches. If that weren't restricted in any way, competitors would be able to use existing servers rather than setting up their own. Using AES at least provides a minor obstacle that might encourage them to set up their own server.

Overall: the hardware seems fine, the software is shoddy and the security is terrible. If you have one of these, set a strong password. There's no rate-limiting on the server, so a weak password will be broken pretty quickly. It's also infringing my copyright, so I'd recommend against it on that point alone.

comment count unavailable comments

Syndicated 2016-06-21 23:11:54 from Matthew Garrett

20 Jun 2016 marnanel   » (Journeyer)

Why I'm voting Remain

If I had to choose either Strasbourg or Westminster to run this country, I'd choose Strasbourg. It has a better separation of powers. Someone asked what I mean by that, so I'll explain more fully.

A bit of civics background-- sorry if you know this already: There are three branches to every government: the legislature which makes laws, the executive which implements those laws, and the judiciary which deals with people who break them. In a carefully-designed system such as the American federal government, the three branches act as checks on one another's power. (In the US, executive=President, legislature=Congress, judiciary=federal courts.) This means that it's much more difficult for one or two people to fuck up the system.

But in the UK and the EU we don't have a complete separation of powers. In particular in the EU we have the executive (the Commission) having the sole power to propose bills to the legislature (the Parliament). This is undemocratic, and it's a problem. The legislature can veto bills, so it acts as a check on the power of the executive. But it cannot act alone.

In the UK, however, the problem is even worse. In our case executive=Downing Street, legislature=Parliament, judiciary=courts. Parliament was originally a check on the power of the King (when the King was the executive). But for the last few centuries, the Crown's ministers have effectively been the executive, and these ministers are always drawn from Parliament. A PM must necessarily almost always be able to order Parliament to do anything they wish, because they must belong to the majority party in the Commons, and MPs almost always vote as the whips tell them to.

So if for example we happened to get someone as PM who was determined to starve the poor and destroy the NHS, there's nobody at all who can stand up to him. In the US or in France it's routine for the legislature to say no to the executive (and vice versa). But it's near-impossible in the UK.

Except...

...there is, at present, one organisation which can say no to the PM.

That organisation is the EU.

That is why I'm voting Remain.

 

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/371177.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Syndicated 2016-06-20 19:36:10 (Updated 2016-06-20 19:38:42) from Monument

19 Jun 2016 sye   » (Journeyer)

to translate:

摘要:《望舒诗论》(原载于1932年《现代》第二卷第一期,收入1933年《望舒草》时更名为《诗论零札》)

《诗论零札》(一)

诗不能借重音乐,它应该去了音乐的成分。

诗不能借重绘画的长处。

单是美的字眼的组合不是诗的特点。

象征派的人们说“大自然是被淫过一千次的娼妇。”但是新的娼妇安知不会被淫过一万次,被淫的次数是没有关系的,我们要有新的淫具,新的淫法。

诗的韵律不在字的抑扬顿挫上,而在诗的情绪的抑扬顿挫上,即在诗情的程度上。

新诗最重要的是诗情上的nuance而不是字句上的nuance(法文:变异)。

韵和整齐的字句会妨碍诗情,或使诗情成为畸形的。倘把诗的情绪去适应呆滞的,表面的旧规律,就和把自己的足去穿别人的鞋子一样。愚劣的人们削足适履,比较聪明一点的人选择较合脚的鞋子,但是智者却为自己制最合自己的脚的鞋子。

诗不是某一个官感的享乐,而是全官感或超官感的东西。

新的诗应该有新的情绪和表现这种情绪的形式。所谓形式,决非表面上的字的排列,也决非新的字眼的堆积。

不必一定拿新的事物来做题材(我不反对拿新的事物来做题材),旧的事物中也能找到新的诗情。
十一
旧的古典的应用是无可反对的,在它给予我们一个新情绪的时候。
十二
不应该有只是炫奇的装饰癖,那是不永存的。
十三
诗应该有自己的originalite(法文:特征),但你须使它有cosmopolite(法文:普遍)性,两者不能缺一。
十四
诗是由真实经过想象而出来的,不单是真实,亦不单是想象。
十五
诗应将自己的情绪表现出来,而使人感到一种东西,诗本身就像是一个生物,不是无生物。
十六
情绪不是用摄影机摄出来的,它应当用巧妙的笔触描写出来。这种笔触又须是活的,千变万化的。
十七
只在用某一种文字写来,某一国人读了感到好的诗,实际上不是诗,那最多是文字的魔术。真的诗的好处并不就是文字的长处。

摘自戴望舒诗文名篇

诗论零札
(最初刊载于《华侨日报 文艺副刊》 第二期,1944年2月6日)
竹头木屑,牛溲马勃,运用得法,可成为诗,否则仍是一堆弃之不足惜的废物。罗绮锦绣,贝玉金珠,运用得法,亦可成为诗,否则还是一些徒炫眼目的不成器的杂碎。
诗的存在在于它的组织。在这里,竹头木屑,牛溲马勃,和罗绮锦绣,贝玉金珠,其价值是同等的。
批评别人的诗说“如七宝楼台,炫人眼目,拆碎下来,不成片段”,是一种不成理之论。问题不是在于拆碎下来成不成片段﹐却是在搭起来是不是一座七宝楼台。
西子捧心,人皆曰美,东施效颦,见者掩面。西子之所以美,东施之所以丑的,并不是捧心或眉颦,而是他们本质上美丑。本质上美的,荆钗布裙不能掩;本质上丑的,珠衫翠袖不能饰。
诗也是如此,它的佳劣不在形式而在内容。有“诗”的诗﹐虽以佶屈聱牙的文字写来也是诗﹐没有“诗”的诗﹐虽韵律整齐音节铿锵,仍然不是诗。只有乡愚才会把穿了彩衣的丑妇当作美人。

说“诗不能翻译”是一个通常的错误。只有坏诗一经翻译才失去一切,因为实际它并没有“诗”包涵在内,而只是字眼和声音的炫弄,只是渣滓。真正的诗在任何语言的翻译中都永远保持着它的价值。而这价值,不但是地域,就是时间也不能损坏的。
翻译可以说是诗的试金石,诗的滤箩。
不用说,我是指并不歪曲原作的翻译。

韵律齐整论者说:有了好的内容而加上“完整的”形式,诗始达于完美之境。
此说听上去好像有点道理,仔细想想,就觉得大谬。诗情是千变万化的,不是仅仅几套形式和韵律的制服所能衣蔽。以为思想应该穿衣裳已经是专断之论了(梵乐希:《文学》),何况主张不论肥瘦高矮,都应该一律穿上一定尺寸的制服?
所谓“完整”并不应该就是“与其他相同”。每一首诗应该有它自己固有的“完整”,即不能移植的它自己固有的形式,固有的韵律。
米尔顿说,韵是野蛮人的创造;但是,一般意义的“韵律”,也不过是半开化人的产物而已。仅仅非难韵实乃五十步笑百步之见。

诗的韵律不应只有浮浅的存在。它不应存在于文字的音韵抑扬这表面,而应存在于诗情的抑扬顿挫这内里。
在这一方面,昂德莱•纪德提出过更正确的意见:“语辞的韵律不应是表面的,矫饰的,只在于锁骼的语言的继承;它应该随着那由一种微妙的起承转合所按拍着的,思想的曲线而波动着。”

定理︰
音乐︰以音和时间来表现的情绪的和谐。
绘画︰以线条和色彩来表现的情绪的和谐。
舞蹈︰以动作来表现的情绪的和谐。
诗︰ 以文字来表现的情绪的和谐。
对于我﹐音乐﹐绘画﹐舞蹈等等﹐都是同义字﹐因为牠们所要表现的是同一的东西。

把不是“诗”的成分从诗里放逐出去。所谓不是“诗”的成分,我的意思是说,在组织起来时对于诗并非必需的东西。例如通常认为美丽的词藻,铿锵的音韵等等。
并不是反对这些词藻、音韵本身。只当它们对于“诗”并非必需,或妨碍“诗”的时候,才应该驱除它们。

戴望舒是现代中国著名翻译家。
他曾译了数量巨大的外国文学名著,其中主要有:(西班牙)伊巴涅思《良夜幽情曲》(上海光华书局,1928年初版),《伊巴涅思短篇小说选》(新文艺出版社,1956年),(法)夏多勃里昂《少女之誓》(上海开明书店,1928年), (法)贝洛尔《鹅妈妈的故事》(上海开明书店,1928年),(法)穆杭《天女玉丽》(上海尚志书店,1929年),(法)古弹词《屋卡珊和尼谷莱特》(上海光华书局,1929年),(法)陀尔诺伊《青色鸟》(上海开明书店,1933年),(法)陀尔诺伊《美人和野兽》(上海开明书店,1933年),《法兰西现代短篇集》(上海天马书店,1934年),(法)梅里美《高龙芭》(上海中华书局,1935年),(法)高莱特《紫恋》(上海光明书店,1935年),(法)蒲尔惹《弟子》(上海中华书局,1936年),(法)波特莱尔《恶之华掇英》(上海怀正文化社,1947年),(苏)里特进斯基《一周间》(上海水沫书店,1930年初版;上海作家书屋,1946重印;人民文学出版社,1958年新版),(苏)伊可维支《唯物史观的文学论》(上海水沫书店,1930年初版;上海作家书屋,1946年重印),(苏)伊凡诺夫《铁甲车》(上海现代书局,1932年初版),(苏)本约明·高力里《苏联诗坛逸话》(上海杂志公司,1936年),《西班牙短篇小说选》(上海商务印书馆,1936年),《意大利短篇小说集》(上海商务印书馆,1935年),《比利时短篇小说集》(上海商务印书馆,1935年),[英]莎士比亚《麦克倍斯》(上海金马书店)等。


转录自 http://www.literature.org.cn/article.aspx?id=19858
戴望舒诗歌创作转向论

18 Jun 2016 marnanel   » (Journeyer)

please do not press this button again

I was once in a psychiatrist's waiting room and they had a coffee machine with enough buttons to belong to Captain Picard. You know the sort of thing-- buttons for white coffee, black coffee, cappucino, hot chocolate, and so on and on. But one of them was unlabelled, and THAT was the one I wanted.

It took a while to brew me a cup. When it had cooled, I took a sip. The stuff was utterly foul-- like a sort of hot instant coffee made with lemons and ammonia. I can still taste it in memory.

Just then, the psychiatrist arrived, and asked what I was grimacing about. I explained the story and showed him the button. "Right," he said. "That's the self-cleaning function."

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/370903.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

Syndicated 2016-06-18 20:56:42 from Monument

15 Jun 2016 elwell   » (Journeyer)

The Physical Web. Yeah, thats a good idea.

In the last week I've discovered the Physical Web from google, and I'm sold on the idea. Apart from the "what's around here" geeky stuff, it's a great idea for sensible 'distant' digital signage. For example, $dayjob is at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, but we don't plaster our URL over the visitor area - what if guests could be gently prompted to the right URL by beacon?

Again tonight (while watching WASO play the Indiana Jones score) I noticed a set of three A3 posters explaining to users of another part of the conference centre how to connect to wifi and download <exhibit> app. This isn't even Scott Jensen's complaint of a 'dos prompt on the browser' - it's more a dig out the index card from the library, then go to the dos prompt...