Older blog entries for softkid (starting at number 302)

Want to understand certs ? SSL and friends ?

My friend kaie made a very nice and explanative talk at fosdem on the subject. It's now available for reading in pdf at http://kuix.de/fosdem2012/fosdem-2012-talk-kaie.pdf

Syndicated 2012-02-06 12:21:28 (Updated 2012-02-06 12:26:02) from Ludovic's weblog

Major Update testday this coming Thursday , January 26th 2012

On January 26th 2012 , the Thunderbird team is organizing a Testday. Our objective is to make sure that we aren't breaking anything for people that will update from 3.1.x to 10.

Instructions on how to participate and how to join are available here : https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird:QA_TestDay:2012-01-26

Syndicated 2012-01-20 10:36:41 (Updated 2012-01-20 10:39:30) from Ludovic's weblog

What's the best way to announce a pgp / gpg keysigning party ?

I'm organizing a Key-signing party - I've contacted people on biglumber.com. I'll probably post the event on upcoming.org. I will contact the local LUG. What else should I do to get more people to attend ?

Syndicated 2012-01-16 10:38:33 (Updated 2012-01-16 10:40:34) from Ludovic's weblog

The tram got of the rails this morning in front of my house

So I filmed it. Framing is bad and part of the image is missing because I exported the video in HD. I'll do better next time.

Syndicated 2012-01-05 17:54:40 (Updated 2012-01-05 17:55:45) from Ludovic's weblog

Third call for sessions for the FOSDEM cross-distribution miniconference

FOSDEM is a yearly conference that takes place in the campus Solbosch of
the Université Libre the Bruxelles, in Brussels, Belgium. The upcoming
edition of FOSDEM will happen during the first weekend of February, that
is, the 4th and 5th of February, 2012.

During the past two editions, there has been a distributions
miniconference at FOSDEM, inviting talks from all distribution projects.
Distributions that have cooperated in the past include Debian, Fedora,
CentOS, openSUSE, Mandriva, NixOS, and more.

The distributions miniconference will happen again this year, and we are
still seeking proposals for sessions.

I've sent out two previous calls for sessions for the miniconference
that set the deadline for talk proposals to December 22nd, 2011, which
is tomorrow.

A list of current proposals can be found at
.
There are some interesting proposals there, but unfortunately there
aren't enough; we'll have two rooms for two days, which means we'll have
around 32 hours worth of talk slots.>

A variety of sessions are welcome; round-table talks, BoFs as well as
presentations, on any subject related to distribution development.
Sessions can be about a subject specific to one particular distribution,
or can be targetted to distribution developers in general.

As said, the original deadline was December 22nd, but I am hereby
extending the deadline until January 1st, 2012.

People interested in holding a talk or chairing a BoF or round table are
hereby invited to submit a proposal to the
distributions@lists.fosdem.org mailinglist (moderated for
non-subscribers), containing the following information:

- their name,
- a (short) bio,
- a title for the session,
- an abstract for the session,
- an expected duration for the session, including time for questions by
the audience.

Note that the distributions@lists.fosdem.org mailinglist may also be
used to discuss possible BoFs or round tables before actually formally
proposing a session, or for general discussion relating to the
miniconference.

Syndicated 2011-12-29 06:57:19 (Updated 2011-12-29 06:58:07) from Ludovic's weblog

Lightning and Thunderbird testing week, a post mortem.

Last week we had our last (to date) community testing effort and the focus was Thunderbird 10 and Lightning 1.0. This was a first for me, dealing with two products during the same week and dealing with a product I don't use too much. I was not too confident that the test cases available for Lightning were up to date - but I thought that some testing was better than none. So I did My usual call to testers using the too many ways we have to do that :


  • Mail to testers

  • Newsgroup post

  • blog post

  • mozillazine post


And I didn't do that on the same day but on the course of two weeks. And I got a bit stressed and worried because the numbers of answers I got was very low. And then Philipp posted on the Calendar blog and my mailbox got filled with people willing to spend some time testing.
The plan was to send instructions when I would get back from mozcamp in Berlin and start the testing effort. Unfortunately I came back sick and was in bed for most of the testing week. I did send instructions and then left my computer unattended for the week as I was sleeping and fighting fever. The instructions I sent did the job for most of the volunteers that had signed up for Thunderbird testing but were confusing to say the least for the many new comers who had signed up for Lightning.

I would like to apologize to the people who wanted to help but got confusing instructions f from me.
I would like to thanks standard8 for getting into #tb-qa and answering people.

And I would like to point out our results :

And I've learned a lot on something I thought I mastered so next time it won't happen the same way for sure.

Syndicated 2011-11-22 10:09:48 (Updated 2011-11-22 10:35:08) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:31:03) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:25:56) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:20:19) from Ludovic's weblog

Test event centered around Thunderbird 10 and Lightning 1.0

It's been a while since we had a testing event. Some of it was probably my fault as I needed to adjust myself to the new release process we adopted since Thunderbird 5.0. Since then I've been lonely testing releases and new features as they came out. It's time to spend a good amount of time testing Thunderbird more thoroughly. We will use litmus as our main testing tool. In litmus you will find groups of test (eg one for address book, one for imap, one for news). Each group is made of one or more tests that needs to be run. As I want to distribute the workload and not only have a few areas tested, I would like you to sign up and tell me that you want to participate to this event.

What is required to participate :

  • An email account that can be used for testing
  • a litmus account
  • an account on bugzilla.mozilla.org
  • some time in the week of 13Th November to 20th November 2011
What will the workflow of this event look like
  • You read this
  • you reply to it - telling me you want to participate
  • On the day the event starts (times will be Central European time) You'll receive an email with:
  1. what to test (eg groups of test I've assigned to you)
  2. a link to the test in litmus
  3. a bugzilla bug number which we will use to track bug found during this event
  4. more detailed instructions on how to use litmus and bugzilla
  5. You organize yourself to run the tests when you have time
  6. You do the tests and give us reports and file bugs if the tests aren't successful

That's it. I will Post results in the middle and at the end of the event.

At the same time we would also like to run the same kind of event for lightning as it's the most used extension with Thunderbird. The workflow will look exactly the same. Just make sure that you tell me you want to test Thunderbird, Thunderbird/Lightning or just Lightning.

Right now the number of people who signed up is below 10 and it would be nice if I could get a few more volunteers in order to be able to have a large coverage of our tests. The best way to reply to this is to send me an email.

Syndicated 2011-11-09 08:40:33 (Updated 2011-11-09 08:53:01) from Ludovic's weblog

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