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Name: Matthew Garrett
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Fixing the IoT isn't going to be easy

A large part of the internet became inaccessible today after a botnet made up of IP cameras and digital video recorders was used to DoS a major DNS provider. This highlighted a bunch of things including how maybe having all your DNS handled by a single provider is not the best of plans, but in the long run there's no real amount of diversification that can fix this - malicious actors have control of a sufficiently large number of hosts that they could easily take out multiple providers simultaneously.

To fix this properly we need to get rid of the compromised systems. The question is how. Many of these devices are sold by resellers who have no resources to handle any kind of recall. The manufacturer may not have any kind of legal presence in many of the countries where their products are sold. There's no way anybody can compel a recall, and even if they could it probably wouldn't help. If I've paid a contractor to install a security camera in my office, and if I get a notification that my camera is being used to take down Twitter, what do I do? Pay someone to come and take the camera down again, wait for a fixed one and pay to get that put up? That's probably not going to happen. As long as the device carries on working, many users are going to ignore any voluntary request.

We're left with more aggressive remedies. If ISPs threaten to cut off customers who host compromised devices, we might get somewhere. But, inevitably, a number of small businesses and unskilled users will get cut off. Probably a large number. The economic damage is still going to be significant. And it doesn't necessarily help that much - if the US were to compel ISPs to do this, but nobody else did, public outcry would be massive, the botnet would not be much smaller and the attacks would continue. Do we start cutting off countries that fail to police their internet?

Ok, so maybe we just chalk this one up as a loss and have everyone build out enough infrastructure that we're able to withstand attacks from this botnet and take steps to ensure that nobody is ever able to build a bigger one. To do that, we'd need to ensure that all IoT devices are secure, all the time. So, uh, how do we do that?

These devices had trivial vulnerabilities in the form of hardcoded passwords and open telnet. It wouldn't take terribly strong skills to identify this at import time and block a shipment, so the "obvious" answer is to set up forces in customs who do a security analysis of each device. We'll ignore the fact that this would be a pretty huge set of people to keep up with the sheer quantity of crap being developed and skip straight to the explanation for why this wouldn't work.

Yeah, sure, this vulnerability was obvious. But what about the product from a well-known vendor that included a debug app listening on a high numbered UDP port that accepted a packet of the form "BackdoorPacketCmdLine_Req" and then executed the rest of the payload as root? A portscan's not going to show that up[1]. Finding this kind of thing involves pulling the device apart, dumping the firmware and reverse engineering the binaries. It typically takes me about a day to do that. Amazon has over 30,000 listings that match "IP camera" right now, so you're going to need 99 more of me and a year just to examine the cameras. And that's assuming nobody ships any new ones.

Even that's insufficient. Ok, with luck we've identified all the cases where the vendor has left an explicit backdoor in the code[2]. But these devices are still running software that's going to be full of bugs and which is almost certainly still vulnerable to at least half a dozen buffer overflows[3]. Who's going to audit that? All it takes is one attacker to find one flaw in one popular device line, and that's another botnet built.

If we can't stop the vulnerabilities getting into people's homes in the first place, can we at least fix them afterwards? From an economic perspective, demanding that vendors ship security updates whenever a vulnerability is discovered no matter how old the device is is just not going to work. Many of these vendors are small enough that it'd be more cost effective for them to simply fold the company and reopen under a new name than it would be to put the engineering work into fixing a decade old codebase. And how does this actually help? So far the attackers building these networks haven't been terribly competent. The first thing a competent attacker would do would be to silently disable the firmware update mechanism.

We can't easily fix the already broken devices, we can't easily stop more broken devices from being shipped and we can't easily guarantee that we can fix future devices that end up broken. The only solution I see working at all is to require ISPs to cut people off, and that's going to involve a great deal of pain. The harsh reality is that this is almost certainly just the tip of the iceberg, and things are going to get much worse before they get any better.

Right. I'm off to portscan another smart socket.

[1] UDP connection refused messages are typically ratelimited to one per second, so it'll take almost a day to do a full UDP portscan, and even then you have no idea what the service actually does.

[2] It's worth noting that this is usually leftover test or debug code, not an overtly malicious act. Vendors should have processes in place to ensure that this isn't left in release builds, but ha well.

[3] My vacuum cleaner crashes if I send certain malformed HTTP requests to the local API endpoint, which isn't a good sign

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Syndicated 2016-10-22 05:14:28 from Matthew Garrett

The importance of paying attention in building community trust

Trust is important in any kind of interpersonal relationship. It's inevitable that there will be cases where something you do will irritate or upset others, even if only to a small degree. Handling small cases well helps build trust that you will do the right thing in more significant cases, whereas ignoring things that seem fairly insignificant (or saying that you'll do something about them and then failing to do so) suggests that you'll also fail when there's a major problem. Getting the small details right is a major part of creating the impression that you'll deal with significant challenges in a responsible and considerate way.

This isn't limited to individual relationships. Something that distinguishes good customer service from bad customer service is getting the details right. There are many industries where significant failures happen infrequently, but minor ones happen a lot. Would you prefer to give your business to a company that handles those small details well (even if they're not overly annoying) or one that just tells you to deal with them?

And the same is true of software communities. A strong and considerate response to minor bug reports makes it more likely that users will be patient with you when dealing with significant ones. Handling small patch contributions quickly makes it more likely that a submitter will be willing to do the work of making more significant contributions. These things are well understood, and most successful projects have actively worked to reduce barriers to entry and to be responsive to user requests in order to encourage participation and foster a feeling that they care.

But what's often ignored is that this applies to other aspects of communities as well. Failing to use inclusive language may not seem like a big thing in itself, but it leaves people with the feeling that you're less likely to do anything about more egregious exclusionary behaviour. Allowing a baseline level of sexist humour gives the impression that you won't act if there are blatant displays of misogyny. The more examples of these "insignificant" issues people see, the more likely they are to choose to spend their time somewhere else, somewhere they can have faith that major issues will be handled appropriately.

There's a more insidious aspect to this. Sometimes we can believe that we are handling minor issues appropriately, that we're acting in a way that handles people's concerns, while actually failing to do so. If someone raises a concern about an aspect of the community, it's important to discuss solutions with them. Putting effort into "solving" a problem without ensuring that the solution has the desired outcome is not only a waste of time, it alienates those affected even more - they're now not only left with the feeling that they can't trust you to respond appropriately, but that you will actively ignore their feelings in the process.

It's not always possible to satisfy everybody's concerns. Sometimes you'll be left in situations where you have conflicting requests. In that case the best thing you can do is to explain the conflict and why you've made the choice you have, and demonstrate that you took this issue seriously rather than ignoring it. Depending on the issue, you may still alienate some number of participants, but it'll be fewer than if you just pretend that it's not actually a problem.

One warning, though: while building trust in this way enhances people's willingness to join your community, it also builds expectations. If a significant issue does arise, and if you fail to handle it well, you'll burn a lot of that trust in the process. The fact that you've built that trust in the first place may be what saves your community from disintegrating completely, but people will feel even more betrayed if you don't actively work to rebuild it. And if there's a pattern of mishandling major problems, no amount of getting the details right will matter.

Communities that ignore these issues are, long term, likely to end up weaker than communities that pay attention to them. Making sure you get this right in the first place, and setting expectations that you will pay attention to your contributors, is a vital part of building a meaningful relationship between your community and its members.

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Syndicated 2016-10-03 17:14:27 from Matthew Garrett

Microsoft aren't forcing Lenovo to block free operating systems

There's a story going round that Lenovo have signed an agreement with Microsoft that prevents installing free operating systems. This is sensationalist, untrue and distracts from a genuine problem.

The background is straightforward. Intel platforms allow the storage to be configured in two different ways - "standard" (normal AHCI on SATA systems, normal NVMe on NVMe systems) or "RAID". "RAID" mode is typically just changing the PCI IDs so that the normal drivers won't bind, ensuring that drivers that support the software RAID mode are used. Intel have not submitted any patches to Linux to support the "RAID" mode.

In this specific case, Lenovo's firmware defaults to "RAID" mode and doesn't allow you to change that. Since Linux has no support for the hardware when configured this way, you can't install Linux (distribution installers will boot, but won't find any storage device to install the OS to).

Why would Lenovo do this? I don't know for sure, but it's potentially related to something I've written about before - recent Intel hardware needs special setup for good power management. The storage driver that Microsoft ship doesn't do that setup. The Intel-provided driver does. "RAID" mode prevents the Microsoft driver from binding and forces the user to use the Intel driver, which means they get the correct power management configuration, battery life is better and the machine doesn't melt.

(Why not offer the option to disable it? A user who does would end up with a machine that doesn't boot, and if they managed to figure that out they'd have worse power management. That increases support costs. For a consumer device, why would you want to? The number of people buying these laptops to run anything other than Windows is miniscule)

Things are somewhat obfuscated due to a statement from a Lenovo rep:This system has a Signature Edition of Windows 10 Home installed. It is locked per our agreement with Microsoft. It's unclear what this is meant to mean. Microsoft could be insisting that Signature Edition systems ship in "RAID" mode in order to ensure that users get a good power management experience. Or it could be a misunderstanding regarding UEFI Secure Boot - Microsoft do require that Secure Boot be enabled on all Windows 10 systems, but (a) the user must be able to manage the key database and (b) there are several free operating systems that support UEFI Secure Boot and have appropriate signatures. Neither interpretation indicates that there's a deliberate attempt to prevent users from installing their choice of operating system.

The real problem here is that Intel do very little to ensure that free operating systems work well on their consumer hardware - we still have no information from Intel on how to configure systems to ensure good power management, we have no support for storage devices in "RAID" mode and we have no indication that this is going to get better in future. If Intel had provided that support, this issue would never have occurred. Rather than be angry at Lenovo, let's put pressure on Intel to provide support for their hardware.

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Syndicated 2016-09-21 17:09:31 from Matthew Garrett

Priorities in security

I read this tweet a couple of weeks ago:

to me, an inclusive security community would focus as much (or at all) on surveillance of women by abusive partners as it does the state

— kelsey ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ (@_K_E_L_S_E_Y) August 2, 2016

and it got me thinking. Security research is often derided as unnecessary stunt hacking, proving insecurity in things that are sufficiently niche or in ways that involve sufficient effort that the realistic probability of any individual being targeted is near zero. Fixing these issues is basically defending you against nation states (who (a) probably don't care, and (b) will probably just find some other way) and, uh, security researchers (who (a) probably don't care, and (b) see (a)).

Unfortunately, this may be insufficient. As basically anyone who's spent any time anywhere near the security industry will testify, many security researchers are not the nicest people. Some of them will end up as abusive partners, and they'll have both the ability and desire to keep track of their partners and ex-partners. As designers and implementers, we owe it to these people to make software as secure as we can rather than assuming that a certain level of adversary is unstoppable. "Can a state-level actor break this" may be something we can legitimately write off. "Can a security expert continue reading their ex-partner's email" shouldn't be.

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Syndicated 2016-08-26 00:02:10 from Matthew Garrett

Microsoft's compromised Secure Boot implementation

There's been a bunch of coverage of this attack on Microsoft's Secure Boot implementation, a lot of which has been somewhat confused or misleading. Here's my understanding of the situation.

Windows RT devices were shipped without the ability to disable Secure Boot. Secure Boot is the root of trust for Microsoft's User Mode Code Integrity (UMCI) feature, which is what restricts Windows RT devices to running applications signed by Microsoft. This restriction is somewhat inconvenient for developers, so Microsoft added support in the bootloader to disable UMCI. If you were a member of the appropriate developer program, you could give your device's unique ID to Microsoft and receive a signed blob that disabled image validation. The bootloader would execute a (Microsoft-signed) utility that verified that the blob was appropriately signed and matched the device in question, and would then insert it into an EFI Boot Services variable[1]. On reboot, the boot loader reads the blob from that variable and integrates that policy, telling later stages to disable code integrity validation.

The problem here is that the signed blob includes the entire policy, and so any policy change requires an entirely new signed blob. The Windows 10 Anniversary Update added a new feature to the boot loader, allowing it to load supplementary policies. These must also be signed, but aren't tied to a device id - the idea is that they'll be ignored unless a device-specific policy has also been loaded. This way you can get a single device-specific signed blob that allows you to set an arbitrary policy later by using a combination of supplementary policies.

This is all fine in the Anniversary Edition. Unfortunately older versions of the boot loader will happily load a supplementary policy as if it were a full policy, ignoring the fact that it doesn't include a device ID. The loaded policy replaces the built-in policy, so in the absence of a base policy a supplementary policy as simple as "Enable this feature" will effectively remove all other restrictions.

Unfortunately for Microsoft, such a supplementary policy leaked. Installing it as a base policy on pre-Anniversary Edition boot loaders will then allow you to disable all integrity verification, including in the boot loader. Which means you can ask the boot loader to chain to any other executable, in turn allowing you to boot a compromised copy of any operating system you want (not just Windows).

This does require you to be able to install the policy, though. The PoC released includes a signed copy of SecureBootDebug.efi for ARM, which is sufficient to install the policy on ARM systems. There doesn't (yet) appear to be a public equivalent for x86, which means it's not (yet) practical for arbitrary attackers to subvert the Secure Boot process on x86. I've been doing my testing on a setup where I've manually installed the policy, which isn't practical in an automated way.

How can this be prevented? Installing the policy requires the ability to run code in the firmware environment, and by default the boot loader will only load signed images. The number of signed applications that will copy the policy to the Boot Services variable is presumably limited, so if the Windows boot loader supported blacklisting second-stage bootloaders Microsoft could simply blacklist all policy installers that permit installation of a supplementary policy as a primary policy. If that's not possible, they'll have to blacklist of the vulnerable boot loaders themselves. That would mean all pre-Anniversary Edition install media would stop working, including recovery and deployment images. That's, well, a problem. Things are much easier if the first case is true.

Thankfully, if you're not running Windows this doesn't have to be a issue. There are two commonly used Microsoft Secure Boot keys. The first is the one used to sign all third party code, including drivers in option ROMs and non-Windows operating systems. The second is used purely to sign Windows. If you delete the second from your system, Windows boot loaders (including all the vulnerable ones) will be rejected by your firmware, but non-Windows operating systems will still work fine.

From what we know so far, this isn't an absolute disaster. The ARM policy installer requires user intervention, so if the x86 one is similar it'd be difficult to use this as an automated attack vector[2]. If Microsoft are able to blacklist the policy installers without blacklisting the boot loader, it's also going to be minimally annoying. But if it's possible to install a policy without triggering any boot loader blacklists, this could end up being embarrassing.

Even outside the immediate harm, this is an interesting vulnerability. Presumably when the older boot loaders were written, Microsoft policy was that they would never sign policy files that didn't include a device ID. That policy changed when support for supplemental policies was added. without this policy change, the older boot loaders could still be considered secure. Adding new features can break old assumptions, and your design needs to take that into account.

[1] EFI variables come in two main forms - those accessible at runtime (Runtime Services variables) and those only accessible in the early boot environment (Boot Services variables). Boot Services variables can only be accessed before ExitBootServices() is called, and in Secure Boot environments all code executing before this point is (theoretically) signed. This means that Boot Services variables are nominally tamper-resistant.

[2] Shim has explicit support for allowing a physically present machine owner to disable signature validation - this is basically equivalent

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Syndicated 2016-08-11 21:58:04 from Matthew Garrett

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