katzj is currently certified at Master level.

Name: Jeremy Katz
Member since: 2000-04-11 20:56:29
Last Login: 2010-12-16 03:33:24

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Homepage: http://velohacker.com

Notes:

Currently, I'm leading up efforts at HubSpot to build out our infrastructure and release tooling to be much more automated so that we can grow.

In the past, I worked for Red Hat on a ton of Fedora, installation, livecd and virtualization related things and then some. I still hang out in Fedora communities some and pop up from time to time.

Outside of work/tech stuff, I'm a cyclist and bike racer on the road and in cyclocross as well as a dad. Little time for, well, anything else.

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My Journey to Becoming a Cyclist

As most who know me know, I consider myself a cyclist. I ride my bike often, do distances that most consider questionable and even at times in pretty unsavory conditions

Eight years ago, this wasn’t the case. I was your typical pretty sedentary software engineer. But I got a bike and started riding a little. I thought that maybe I would get to where I would do a 50 mile ride. Or a metric century (that’s 62 miles/100 km for those not in bike circles). But I was going up and down the bike path so was at 15-20 miles. 25 was long for me.

And then I decided one Saturday morning in May to join the group ride from the bike shop down the street, Quad Cycles. I showed up and it was a little intimidating. There were probably 30-40 people and they all looked like they knew what they were doing. As we hit the time for the ride to start, Bobby yells out asking for anyone who is new. I acknowledge and he describes the ride. I figure I’ll ride to the end of the bike path and then ride home. But we got to the end of the path and Bobby encouraged me to continue and said he would ride with me. I think I rode 30 or so miles that day, all of it with Bobby right with me.

From there, I began riding more. Bobby encouraged me to do the Red Ribbon Ride. He always was encouraging people to do a charity ride to give back for all that we had. But it was a two day ride totaling 175 miles. And it was two months away. A little intimidating for someone who hadn’t been riding at all six months earlier. But he encouraged me and I did it and it was incredible.

The rest, as they say, is history. But I saw the same thing play out many many times over the following years. Someone new to riding encouraged to push themselves, to go further than they thought they could, to give back. And always to be nice to everybody while doing so.

RIP Bobby… you will be missed even more than you could know. I am glad to have called you my friend. I only hope that I can be as encouraging and helpful to others as you once were to me. And I’ll never forget to ride with love in my heart and a smile on my face.

Syndicated 2014-03-24 22:51:23 from Jeremy's Thoughts

Build systems are the new black

So I got into a little bit of a twitter argument last night about distro packaging. Which actually wasn’t where I was trying to go (this time ;) ) One of the problems with twitter is that 140 characters can be hard sometimes. So let’s see if more characters help.

There is a big push afoot from a lot of people towards omnibus packaging. It seems especially prevalent in the world of things written in Ruby I suspect because most even “current” Linux distros are or were shipping some Ruby 1.8.x build up until very recently. And people want to take advantage of the newer language features.

I have a lot I could write on this topic. But I’m not going to today.

The main point I was trying to make is that in going down this path, people are putting together increasingly large build chains that have complex dependencies and take a long time. And so they’re starting to do things like caching of sources, looking at short-circuited builds and a whole lot of other related things. Which, incidentally, are all things that all of the Linux distributions ran into, fought with and figured out (admittedly, each in their own way) years ago. So rather than just rediscover these things and do it yet another way, there’s a ton of knowledge that could be gained from people that have built distribution build systems to make things better for the omnibus world.

So reach out to people that have worked on things like the Debian build system, the OpenSuSE build system, plague, koji and a slew of others. There are some tricks and a lot of tools which are just as valuable as when they started being used. Things like caching build roots and how to fingerprint them for changes, what ccache can and can’t be good for, how to store things reasonably in a lookaside to not depend on upstream repositories being down while you build, incremental builds vs not, ccache, …

Just because you think that building system RPM or DEB packages doesn’t meet the needs of your users doesn’t mean that you have to throw away all of the work and experience that has gone into the toolchains and build systems present there.

Syndicated 2013-09-10 14:42:09 from Jeremy's Thoughts

One year with Stackdriver

A year ago this week, I started at Stackdriver.  As the first engineer with the company, there wasn’t anything when I started. We had some ideas, solid funding and a small core group to start figuring out our product and building it.

Out first "office"

Working out of our first “office” in a classroom at Northeastern

Going in, I thought I had some idea of what I was doing and what I was in for. I mean, I’d been at later stage startups and heard the stories. I’d read the Eric Ries Lean Startup book. I had read all of the “blogs you’re supposed to read” and had them in my RSS reader so that I could soak up collective wisdom regularly.

In some ways, I was right… in others, I was wrong. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of things that are sticking with me after a year. That said, if you’re reading this because you’re thinking about or planning on joining a startup at an early stage, there’s a good chance you’ll have different ones that are important for you :)

  • Hiring is the single most important thing you can do. Good hires amplify everyone around them and make the team smarter and more effective. It’s pithy and everyone says it. But they say it because it’s true.
  • Hiring takes way more time than you think it will. Your network (and your network’s network) is the best way to source candidates. You’ll post your positions on various job boards and you’ll very very very occasionally get lucky with it. Recruiters will come from everywhere promising great results but will take up even more time since their candidate flow is way higher. Another challenge with recruiters is that when you are before the launch of your product, it can be difficult to convey what you’re doing as well as exactly the type of person you are looking for to join the team.
  • Fancy new technology is sexy and fun to work with. It also has a lot of problems you don’t have experience with. If you can minimize the number of these you have to deal with, you’ll be able to spend more time focusing on building the right product for the right problem
  • It’s hard to spend too much time talking with your target customer. If you think that what you have (be it a mockup or a prototype or something else) is “ready” to show to them, you’ve probably waited too long and could have gotten feedback already and learned something
  • Fail fast. Some things you try won’t work. Don’t continue to fixate on them and sink more time on them if they’re not coming together.
  • If you’re building something that’s a B2B product, think of your beta as a chance to test selling in addition to the product. Sure, you’re not going to have them pay today but you do want to know that you’re building something that people will pay for when you’re ready to switch to that.
  • Think iteratively. Once you start to hone in on a degree of product market fit, you’re going to discover that some of the things you built for prototyping/testing purposes don’t work. Don’t be afraid to replace them. But do so in a way that lets you regularly checkpoint the replacement to test that you are making things better. Grand rewrites are rarely as grand as you think and always take longer
  • If you’re going to spend a lot of time on something product-side, focus more on getting the interfaces right than the implementation. So, for example, if you decide that something is going to have clear boundaries passing messages over a queue, then you can switch between RabbitMQ, SQS and others with minimal effort as you learn the constraints that actually matter for your implementation.
  • Try to find the one piece of your product that immediately pops in a demo for most of your target users. This is one of those things where you’ll know what it is when you see it. And then use it as a hook to start drawing people in.
  • Interactions with the customer don’t end when they sign up for your product. Continue to nurture them and do regular feedback calls with them as you iterate on the product. This will help to make them into advocates for your service and they’re already bought into your vision making it
  • Bugs happen. Fixing them and providing awesome customer service is a great way to foster great customer relationships

It’s been a wild and crazy year but I have had a blast. I’ve done a bit of everything and learned things I didn’t even know there were to learn. Launching the beta of our cloud monitoring product a few months ago was an awesome experience and watching as we’ve started ramping up our sales engine to engage with customers and try it out has been phenomenal. And I’m really looking forward to the next step of launching the paid product and starting to track everything that goes along with that.

Here’s to the next year and many more after that!

Syndicated 2013-08-08 14:35:15 from Jeremy's Thoughts

The 2013 Assault on Mt Mitchell

As a kid growing up, one of the things I enjoyed doing was riding my bike.  In the woods, on the road, anywhere.  I even did some group rides at the time although I was on a mountain bike for them. And I remember hearing of some of the bigger rides in western North Carolina at that point… Bridge to Bridge and the Assault on Mt Mitchell, notably.  So when I really started to get back into riding a while ago, I thought about at some point going and doing some of those rides. Since I’m not really doing any road racing this year due to being a bit too busy with work, I decided to try to tackle some of these long and hard rides that I’ve wanted to do for a few years to keep me motivated and riding hard.

First up is the Assault on Mt Mitchell.  For a bit of background, Mt Mitchell is the highest point east of the Mississippi ending up over 6000 ft.  And about an hour from where I grew up.  So starts out sounding a little intimidating.  The ride itself actually starts in Spartanburg, SC and you then spend the first 75 miles riding along rolling hills until you reach Marion, NC.  From Marion, you go up 5000 ft over the remaining 25 miles.  Okay, lots of climbing when you’re already tired.  This sounds awesome.  I’m in.

The route map Elevation profile for the assault

Preparation and Pre-Ride

I signed up for the ride back when registration opened in March.  From that point, I received a steady stream of emails detailing the training rides that they offered and suggested including things that covered a lot of the route.  Living about 900 miles away, those weren’t an option. So I basically did a pretty typical set of spring riding for me; stretched out some rides a little more to get more rides in the 80+ mile range instead of 50-60s but no real hill work, etc.

Given that my parents still live in NC, we decided to make a family trip down to see them.  So I shipped my bike via FedEx to my dad’s office (unnerving!) and we flew down.  We arrived on Saturday, I put my bike together and did a little loop on Sunday to stretch the legs and shake down the bike after reassembling it.  All good.  I packed everything I needed, the bike survived being shipped, and my legs even felt decent with the lack of riding I had done the week before.

Of course, up until this point, the weather forecast for the ride on Monday was looking less than great.  Showers and thunderstorms through the day.  Because riding 100 miles in the rain is fun.  Ugh.  Luckily, after riding in some sloppy drizzle on Sunday, the forecast for Monday magically got better.  I’ll take it!

The Start

Given it’s about an hour and a half from my parents house to Spartanburg and roll out is at 6:30, we stayed at the Marriott around the corner from the start on Sunday night. So Monday morning, I woke up super early and headed to the start with plenty of time.  Breakfast was my first rice cake of the day (the classic egg + bacon recipe for this batch) although in hindsight I should have gone for something more.  As I had picked up my packet and number the night before, I didn’t really have to do anything other than get to the start which was nice.  As I did so, the size of the event really started to become clear, around 1000 cyclists all told.

Click to view slideshow.

I made my way towards the front of where people were lining up.  We had the entire street (four lanes) and I wasn’t going to get caught up in the back.  I had modest goals for the event — stick with the front as long as I felt comfortable but mostly in it to finish.  Time wasn’t at the front of my mind as I was thinking of it as a ride, not a race really.  As the countdown got to zero, we took off.  And the front went fast… we were going a sprightly 26-27 mph for the first mile or two.  This was made possible largely due to the awesome support the event provided — a police detail at the front, officers at every intersection to let us through.  And this largely continued for the entire route.

To Marion

As we got going, the pace settled somewhat and I just sat in to draft as much as I could.  <rant>There was a ton of just random braking, though. The smell of burning carbon wheels filled the air more often than not. I think a lot of the braking was due to people crossing the yellow line, seeing oncoming traffic and then trying to rejoin the peloton.  It was nerve racking and quite frankly unnecessary.  And I think it was also the cause of the one person that I heard go down at one point behind me.  If event organizers have made it so that we have full use of a lane rather than just two abreast, people should respect that.</rant>  As a result of the pace and the braking, the lead group continued to shed people.  Given that I wasn’t really trying to be in the front, I ended up on the wrong end of those sheds a few times and had to jump hard to close the gap and rejoin the lead group.

Unfortunately, around mile 60, I got gapped and couldn’t close it.  22 mph for that stretch and I was ready to drop.  Was bummed not to hold out until Marion at that point but I also knew I needed to save some energy for the second part of the ride.  So I ended up in a little group of about 8 people and we did a solid bit of effort working together.  But when we got to Marion, my bottles were empty so I stopped to refill and lost my group.  And I then just missed the second big group moving through and couldn’t quite catch them meaning that for the remainder of the ride, I was going to be doing it basically solo.

Marion to the Parkway

As I headed out of Marion after the stop, I had a difficult time finding a rhythm riding alone for the first time of the day.  I think I definitely would have been better in a group in this section as it wasn’t that intense but I definitely wasn’t at my best.  I kept going and didn’t stop at the next rest stop.  And after that is when the climbing really felt like it began.  That section of Rt 80 was grueling. Luckily, I ran into others who said it was the hardest four miles of the ride. So I believed them and just tried to settle in and keep my legs moving.  But looking at the data from the ride, you can see just how slow it was. I just suffered through it and accepted that the rest of the day was going to be hard. And I just kept watching the mileage creep along knowing that the next rest stop wasn’t that far ahead. Switchbacks, steady climbing… you really can’t find anything like it in Massachusetts. On the plus side, the scenery was gorgeous or at least seemed so to my oxygen starved brain.

Click to view slideshow.

Photos courtesy of Blind Kenny

Finally, I reached the rest stop at the 87 mile point where you turn onto the Blue Ridge Parkway.  I stopped and drank some Coke, ate a cookie and refilled my bottle.  Although I had done the first 75 miles in under 3.5 hours, the next 12 had taken me a little over an hour. Of course, this section was about 2000 ft of vertical gain, mostly in the second half.

The Blue Ridge Parkway

The next section of the route was on the Blue Ridge Parkway. I’d say that the BRP is one of the classic roads for biking with lots of group rides as well as training camps and the like taking part on various chunks of it. And after riding 11.5 miles of it, I see why. The road conditions are great, there isn’t a ton of traffic and it’s a steady, hard effort.  Although I expected a little bit of a respite based on what I was told on my way up Rt 80, it really didn’t come.  But riding along the parkway including the scenic overlooks and the tunnels made it worth it.  On a few occasions, I wanted to stop and take photos just given the sheer beauty of the scenery… but I realized if I did, I would be unable to get started again and so I just kept pedaling.  This became especially true around mile 90 when I cracked kind of hard.  Luckily, that was also when there was the remaining downhill segment of the day. I was soft pedaling down but was getting cold given the cloud cover and the elevation and so ended up picking things back up a little.  Honestly, other than that I remember little of this section.  I know I was being passed by people and also that I was passing people back but it didn’t leave as big of an impression.  It was just more of a steady slog and a mental struggle to reach Mt Mitchell Parkway

Final Stretch

After 11.5 miles on the BRP, you turn onto Mt Mitchell Parkway for the final five miles.  I was starting to feel like it was in the bag and started to relax a little bit at this point, feeling my energy level pick up a little.  The section to the last rest stop was still kind of grueling though. Not as bad as Rt 80 and you know that it’s shorter so that helps a lot. I passed a lot of people cramping on this section, though. I was pretty happy with having stuffed a bunch of single serving Skratch Labs secret drink mixes into my pocket and using them rather than Gatorade, especially as I saw that. A few people who had seemed quite strong earlier on were definitely suffering here. But I felt like I was getting stronger for the first half here.

The final rest stop was at the entrance to the State Park and I quickly stopped for a little more Coke here as I felt the sugar would help on the final little ascent. But it was a super quick little stop and then I was on my way.  The grade here let up a decent amount and so I was able to stand and really kick it a bit.  As I passed the parking lot with the yellow Penske trucks (used for transporting bikes back down the mountain), I knew I was almost there and so of course that was the one point where I got a twinge of crampiness.  I pushed through it, though and finished strong.

I ended up with an official chip time of 6:34:33 and a moving time from my Garmin of about 6:20.  Since I had hoped to end up between 6 and 6.5 hours, that was right on target.  And my time put me at 131st of the 719 people who completed the race and 10th for my age group. Not shabby at all for my first time doing it.

Post-Ride

After crossing the finish line, my bike was immediately whisked away from me and I stumbled up to where our dry bags were. I changed into something that didn’t have a chamois (hooray) and grabbed some of the tomato soup that was there as well as a bag of Doritos (mmm, salt). I then made my way to the bus to start heading back to Marion.  The ride back to Marion was pretty quiet and I caught up on Twitter and chatted with the guy sitting next to me.  He had done the ride a few times before and finished about 10 minutes behind me.

Click to view slideshow.

When we got to Marion, I wandered over and made myself a plate of food and kind of forced myself to eat it even though I was in the “not even hungry any more” state as I waited for my bike to make it down the mountain.  Kara, Madeline and my mom met me there and then I got my bike and it was on our way back to my parents’ house for the rest of my trip.

Closing Thoughts

So after doing all of it, I have a few thoughts about the ride.  First of all, it is very well run. Police escort out of Spartanburg, every turn well attended (with traffic stopped!), good rest stops (at least, the ones I stopped at).  The route was awesome — great roads, low traffic, lots of good hard climbing but also some stuff that in a group can just fly by. Getting people + bikes down from the top of the mountain to Marion also went more smoothly than I expected.

Click to view slideshow.

Really the only bad I can point to is the behavior of some of the other riders. I saw somewhat rampant littering (gu wrappers, bottles, everything) and even with full use of the lane, people were frequently in the left lane when we were in the large group. Kind of disappointing and reflects poorly on cyclists in general.

Will I do it again?  Probably at some point.  The logistics make it difficult to commit to doing regularly but I’d definitely like to make another pass at it and see if I can get my time under six hours.  To do so would require at least some concerted and different training that I’m not 100% sure how I’d get but I do think it’s doable.

Final ride data is up at Strava as usual.  242 suffer score, Training Peaks gave it a TSS of 471 (both based on heart rate, not power at this point). All in all, not a bad day on the bike.

Syndicated 2013-05-27 18:00:06 from Jeremy's Thoughts

Thoughts on DevOpsDays NYC

I’m currently on the train on my way back from DevOpsDays in Brooklyn. The conference was great — lots of smart people facing a lot of similar problems and trying to see what we could learn from each other. The scale was small, with only like 100-ish people present and not a ton of huge, in your face sponsorship. And the venue was a college campus. And so I kept making these comparisons in my head to LUG meetings, installfests and small scale Linux conferences.

Obviously the subject matter was a bit different — talking about and thinking about running large scale production infrastructures is a little bit different than the next cool Linux distribution. This tended, I think, to more discussion around patterns and best practices than about the specifics of “you should do X to get Y to work”. So a higher level and more abstract discussion.

The composition of the audience and attendees was a pretty similar make-up. Linux events always had a strong majority of the attendees who self-identified as sysadmins and then there tended to be a smaller number of developers. And many of the latter group had ended up in that camp due to necessity. The breakdown for DevOpsDays felt pretty similar with an interesting twist where there were speakers who said they were (paraphrasing) “developers first and fell into operations because they needed to”.

One thing that felt more evolutionary than anything else was that the side channel discussion for the event took place on Twitter rather than on IRC. I have (fond) memories of many conferences where attendees sat in an IRC channel and then basically continued to interact on IRC long after the conference had ended. In fact, I made many friends in this fashion. Similarly there was an ongoing discussion on Twitter using the #devopsdays hash tag and I have followed (and am being followed by) a number of the other attendees and hope to keep in touch and call them friends in the future.

And maybe the thing that struck me the most strongly was where people were “from”. Not in the sense of where they lived but rather where they worked. The attendees were almost all from startups. We were in Brooklyn and not the heart of downtown Manhattan, but NYC is probably home to more financial services companies than anywhere else in the world. And all of those companies have *many* people working in software dev and operations-y roles. But they weren’t there.

So it feels like “the DevOps movement” is going through a similar growth and evangelism pattern as open source and Linux did years ago. Maybe that’s why it feels so comfortable to me.

Syndicated 2013-01-19 17:01:50 from Jeremy's Thoughts

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