10 Apr 2001 jameson   » (Master)

Frightening news from claudio: It's back! With a vengenance! It's got the Star Generator, and it's probably trashing Mega-Tokyo (no, not Megatokyo) right now!
It's definitely great to see this project (one of the original motivations for starting FreeSCI) resurrected. However, the URL would appear to be slightly different than indicated in the original post- the other project referenced looks interesting, too, though...
I still think the new FreeSCI gfx subsystem (which desparately needs a name!) can be strapped onto Sarien. It'd probably add some overhead, but it would allow Sarien to take advantage of all of FreeSCI's graphics drivers, such as GGI, and... uh... the Xlib driver... and... the partially implemented SDL driver.... OK, still, there might be some benefits, such as trilinear filtering, or maybe some performance improvements on system with more memory. Or maybe not. But it'd be something I should try eventually...

/dev/sequencer doesn't like me. Somehow, we run out of partials (voices) much too soon, even though a sufficient number of note-offs (MIDI 8x... or was that 9x?) are sent. Also, far too many gfx optimizations appear to be hitting worst-case situations (especially noticeable in the HQ character setup screen). Don't like that at all.
A few interesting suggestions regarding extending SCI have been suggested on the IRC channel, mostly regarding BSD socket support. Personally, I think a more interesting challenge would be to extend the interpreter to have 32 bit support without breaking the existing 16 bit code. Anyway, general interest in using SCI for new stuff bodes well regarding Brian Provinciano's SCI development thingy. Don't think I'd want to use a 16 bit interpreter for a new project, though...

Interpreters and virtual machines
I got an interesting mail from someone who slightly mis-judged the order of magnitude of FreeSCI and wanted to pit it against Java and .NET. He was rather persistant with this, especially since, as he pointed out, a proprietary VM called ICVM was much faster than Java on his system. From what I can tell, ICVM looks like a more register-based approach (like Dis) with a highly CISC instruction set. Due to the CISCness, the interpreter overhead was supposed to be rather small, making a JIT unneccessary.
However, the design of ICVM looks rather PC-centric- most of its registers are 32 bit, and it only has 6 general purpose integer and 3 general purpose floating point registers (On most architectures, you could play Space War in the remaning registers without this noticeably affecting performance...).
Anyway, the main point he was making was that there ought to be a free VM design around. Creating a good real-life VM would certainly be an interesting challenge, but I'm not sure whether it'd help Free Software in general- after all, it would just encourage people to keep their stuff closed again. Then again, it might help making non-mainstream platforms more popular, which might turn out to affect the BSDs and GNU/Linux positively... Of course, the amount of work needed to create something in the order of manitude of Java would be immense. A more sane starting point would probably be to start off an existing project (such as Python) and use its libraries, tweak its VM for performance, and write a gcc backend for it...
Well, I guess I'm spending too much time thinking about this- a project of this kind couldn't happen without massive interest from a group of powerful hackers, and I don't think we'll see that.

Looks like Exult will be going into Debian's contrib. IMHO that's pretty good news, but I'm not certain whether the auto-built Alpha port will work well (since they're probably building it with gcc rather than cxx).

Watched the first ten episodes of Cowboy Bebop for the third time (with a constantly increasing audience). I do have the third DVD lying around here, but, not having a DVD player myself, I'll have to wait for other people to have some spare time in order to finally learn what happens after Ganymede Elegy...
Mononoke Hime is going to be shown in our local theaters RSN. Only two more weeks or so...

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