28 Aug 2012 etbe   » (Master)

SSD for a Workstation

SSDs have been dropping in price recently so I just bought four Intel 120G devices for $115 each. I installed the first one for my mother in law who had been complaining about system performance. Her system boot time went from 90 seconds to 20 seconds and a KDE login went from about 35 seconds to about 10 seconds. The real problem that she had reported was occasional excessive application delay, while it wasn’t possible to diagnose that properly I think it was a combination of her MUA doing synchronous writes while other programs such as Chromium were doing things. To avoid the possibility of a CPU performance problem I replaced her 1.8GHz E4300 system with a 2.66GHz E7300 that I got from a junk pile (it’s amazing what’s discarded nowadays).

I also installed a SSD in my own workstation (a 2.4GHz E4600). The boot time went down from 45s on Ext4 without an encrypted root to 27s with root on BTRFS including the time taken to enter the encryption password (maybe about 23s excluding my typing time). The improvement wasn’t as great, but that’s because my workstation does some things on bootup that aren’t dependent on disk IO such as enabling a bridge with STP (making every workstation a bridge is quieter than using switches). KDE login went from about 27s to about 12s and the time taken to start Chromium and have it be usable (rather than blocking on disk IO) went from 30 seconds to an almost instant response (maybe a few seconds)! Tests on another system indicates that Chromium startup could be improved a lot by purging history, but I don’t want to do that. It’s unfortunate that Chromium only supports deleting recent history (to remove incriminating entries) but doesn’t support deleting ancient history that just isn’t useful.

I didn’t try to seriously benchmark the SSD (changing from Ext4 to BTRFS on my system would significantly reduce the accuracy of the results), I have plans for doing that on more important workloads in the near future. For the moment the most casual tests have shown a significant performance benefit so it’s clear that an SSD is the correct storage option for any new workstation which doesn’t need more than 120G of storage space. $115 for SSD vs $35 for HDD is a fairly easy choice for a new system. For larger storage the price of hard drives increases more slowly than that of SSD.

In spite of the performance benefits I doubt that I will gain a real benefit from this in the next year. The time taken to install the SSD equates to dozens of boot cycles which given a typical workstation uptime in excess of a month is unlikely to happen soon. One minor benefit is that deleting messages in Kmail is an instant operation which saves a little annoyance and there will be other occasional benefits.

One significant extra benefit is that an SSD is quiet and dissipates less heat which might allow the system cooling fans to run more slowly. As noisy computers annoy me an SSD is a luxury feature. Also it’s good to test new technologies that my clients may need.

The next thing on my todo list is to do some tests of ZFS with SSD for L2ARC and ZIL.

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Syndicated 2012-08-28 12:40:05 from etbe - Russell Coker

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