Older blog entries for bytesplit (starting at number 66)

17 Oct 2002 (updated 17 Oct 2002 at 04:00 UTC) »
fejj, I am curious about your rantings. If you don't want to make Linux and Unix users happy, then why are you developing for the Gnome project in the first place? It's difficult for me to imagine that people just email you or chat with these god-awful messages that you say they do. I personally don't know any computer users who would act the way you are portraying these folks do. On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise me to see a developer spout off with elitest-drivel, without ever caring whether it was warranted or not ... just because one felt he had the right to do so. I don't really think that computer users are all THAT bad, are they?
6 Oct 2002 (updated 6 Oct 2002 at 01:52 UTC) »
movement , in total agreement here. I admit that I don't know enough about politics to even come close to debating it, but I really don't think I even want to know. Personally, I enjoy coming here to read the tech talk.
6 Oct 2002 (updated 6 Oct 2002 at 01:49 UTC) »

have decided to focus on C++, tomorrow might decide to focus on Java. bleh :(

dyork:

I feel so sorry for your friend's sister. As much as I think hearing about this makes *my* life as a hard-of-hearing person that much better, there is an emptiness in trying to rationalize what your friend's sister is going through. It's just awful, and I am sorry to hear about that. May the final moments be pain-free and reminscent of happier moments.

Yawn ... zzzz




It's time to hit the books, something I should have been doing since the beginning of the semester. Why must I always come up with a good "system" for studying, doing homework, preparing for exames ... weeks into the semester ?!?

google isn't letting me know why I am getting that "no newline at end of file" warning/error when I compile a C++ program with g++ ... is it an error or warning? shouldn't something like that have been taken care long ago?

back to VC++ for me, it seems where formatting and locating of errors is better done than in gcc or g++.

NOW I see the importance of taking classes like Data Structures. Ya know, those classes that teach one how to design algorithms and understand already existing algorithms for use in programming. I've never written a game, and the first one I want to write is a Tic-Tac-Toe one. The problem is that although I don't have a problem with 2D and 3D arrays per se, I am struggling with how to check every single piece (in the case of Tic-Tac-Toe there would be 9 pieces) and its neighbors for matching pieces, to determine if a player has won the game with three matching game pieces in a row.

I figure that from doing that, I can scale the algorithm to handle "neighbor checking" in a game like Connect-Four.

The next thing that I want to learn in programming C++ from the console is how to erase input (the effect of pressing an invisible BACKSPACE key), which would make for some cool effects such as a timer in a clock program, or a count-down in a game like Space Invaders, or a type-writing tutor.

Lately I've been having daytime "sweats". I've never been one to have problems with sweating, so this is troubling me. Does it have something to do with the thyroid? Could it be that I am at my all-time in weight (5'6" 155 lbs which isn't much)? Could it be the stress of school? Or some other health related problem?

it seems that diary entries of numerous folks are not appearing in the "recent diary entries" section. this needs to be fixed.

At the moment, I am at a standstill in programming. I *still* don't have any projects completed. The positive thing is that I am not the only one who has experienced this. I am tiring of the scripting languages.

My choices for compiled programming languages have come down to C, C++ and Java. Java is too slow, but a beautiful language. C++ is very complex, especially so for beginner programmers, but a very powerful language. C is a very fast language, but lacks the OOP features (and I'm sure many other things I don't know about).

So, which one? Right now I need something fun to work on. I thought about trying to write a Tetris game, which would be my first game ever written. I can imagine the playing field as being one huge 2D array, and simply looping through the array on the dropping of each block, terminating the program when the very top/middle block is already full (thus meaning no more blocks can be dropped).

Which language would be best for learning how to program this game in? With the previous link I posted, that site does seem to be dead. The author highly recommends starting to write games in the C language, but if you listen to the many opinions out there, many say that C++ is the better language to start out with, because it contains all of C's features and more.

Please, some of the better writers and more experienced programmers on this site, put up an article about this very thing. I'm not interested in hearing "whatever suits the purpose", because if I knew that answer I wouldn't be asking. Besides, general statements are just that.

Is there a window manager out there that does it job well? My criteria are (a) ease of navigation between programs; and (b) pleasing to the eye. I think that KDE and Gnome are very pretty interfaces to Linux and Unix, but are too heavy. By heavy, I mean it is just too "busy". By busy I mean there is too much for the user to look at, there isn't enough room (without using more than one desktop) to work with.

That is why I moved to FluxBox. FluxBox is beautiful :) I hope I don't sound like a griper, but I have one. Maybe this is a browser issue. But, let me describe what happens. When I first open up a Mozilla session, the browser stays in its place, meaning that the FluxBox task bar is visible. Give it time, though. Soon the Mozilla window is covering the entire desktop, and you can't even see the 'x' (close) button :(

I really like how easy it is to configure the menu in FluxBox. However, some of my apps are not starting, at least I can't see them running. The programs are running in the background, however. It takes me running a 'killall <program name>' to stop the programs. In fact, it has gotten so bad that I have to switch to another console from X and reboot the machine. Whoa! I never thought about killing X from that other console, so I'll try that soon.

Very soon here, I am going to look into programming for Linux. I've pieced together a set of tools to use, still need to determine which graphics API I want to use. Tck? Gtk? Kde? Gnome? Any opinions are very welcome, and because I don't think this has anything to with "depends on personal need", and everything to do with what people as a whole are using, I am welcoming any suggestions on this.

tk, I see. If you can't stand reading what I have to say, and are really that persistent in refusing to admit that your actions were uncalled for, then do the easy thing. Ignore me :)

tk, here we go again. Please tell me why you feel you can't go for any amount of time before finding someone to trash? I find you to be rather disrespecting, in the way that you call me a kook. Do you see me going around saying these things about you? You trash me first, I - WILL - defend myself. However, you won't find me trashing you. Period. My latest plea to you is to support your arguments with legible facts, and leave the name calling and referencing out of it. The idea here is to talk about open source, our contributions the open source world, not try to aggravate the public and having people trash one another. We are a community, right?
24 Aug 2002 (updated 24 Aug 2002 at 17:32 UTC) »

Since when did folks feel that everyone on Advogato.org enjoys hearing them brag about how they were in the gifted class as children, they were more intelligent than nearly all of the teachers, that they couldn't understand why someone in IRC doesn't like them and they had to do an awful thing like ban the person?

When people act like that, I find it very difficult to believe anything they say, and wonder if these people have a grudge against the world for their own mistakes and shortcomings.

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