24 Feb 2017 LaForge   » (Master)

Manual testing of Linux Kernel GTP module

In May 2016 we got the GTP-U tunnel encapsulation/decapsulation module developed by Pablo Neira, Andreas Schultz and myself merged into the 4.8.0 mainline kernel.

During the second half of 2016, the code basically stayed untouched. In early 2017, several patch series of (at least) three authors have been published on the netdev mailing list for review and merge.

This poses the very valid question on how do we test those (sometimes quite intrusive) changes. Setting up a complete cellular network with either GPRS/EGPRS or even UMTS/HSPA is possible using OsmoSGSN and related Osmocom components. But it's of course a luxury that not many Linux kernel networking hackers have, as it involves the availability of a supported GSM BTS or UMTS hNodeB. And even if that is available, there's still the issue of having a spectrum license, or a wired setup with coaxial cable.

So as part of the recent discussions on netdev, I tested and described a minimal test setup using libgtpnl, OpenGGSN and sgsnemu.

This setup will start a mobile station + SGSN emulator inside a Linux network namespace, which talks GTP-C to OpenGGSN on the host, as well as GTP-U to the Linux kernel GTP-U implementation.

In case you're interested, feel free to check the following wiki page: https://osmocom.org/projects/linux-kernel-gtp-u/wiki/Basic_Testing

This is of course just for manual testing, and for functional (not performance) testing only. It would be great if somebody would pick up on my recent mail containing some suggestions about an automatic regression testing setup for the kernel GTP-U code. I have way too many spare-time projects in desperate need of some attention to work on this myself. And unfortunately, none of the telecom operators (who are the ones benefiting most from a Free Software accelerated GTP-U implementation) seems to be interested in at least co-funding or otherwise contributing to this effort :/

Syndicated 2017-02-23 23:00:00 from LaForge's home page

Latest blog entries     Older blog entries

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!